Showing: 238 RESULTS
News Nintendo Videos

Gengar Gets to Spook Us All in Song This Holiday Season

Gengar is the most recent Pokémon to receive its very own song! As one of the original Ghost-type Pokémon, Gengar boasts a spooky song in tone and lyrics. Hopefully he doesn’t give any viewers nightmares this Christmas, especially not beforehand.

The bulk of the song talks about Gengar being both a stalker and a creature dead set on bringing darkness to others’ souls. The musical bounce is reminiscent of Halloween, so be sure not to get your holidays mixed up this time of year. Or do. Whatever pleases Gengar is best after all.

Which Pokémon should get its own song next? Give us your suggestions in the comments down below!

No
ChannelImages
Our Verdict

Top

Indie News Retro Videos

First 4 Figures Reveals Three Gorgeous Shovel Knight Figurines

First 4 Figures has been creating amazing sculptures of some of gaming’s most popular characters for years. It’s only natural that the company finally tackle crafting indie darling Shovel Knight, in three forms no less! He comes in his classic blue armor, but can also be purchased in gold and wearing the Toader helmet found in-game.

Any of the three individual statues is available for $299.99 USD. The blue- and gold-armored Shovel Knight figures can be bundled together for a discounted $549.99 for the wealthiest and boldest of Shovel Knight fans. You can browse these creations and buy here.

What do you think of these new figurines? Are you willing to shell out some major gold for any of these? Are you perfectly fine with your Shovel Knight Amiibo instead? Let us know in the comments below!

Source: First 4 Figures

No
ChannelImages
Our Verdict

Bottom

News Nintendo Switch PC PlayStation 4 Xbox One

Adventure Time is Getting an Open-World Game, Coming to All Home Consoles and PC Next Spring

It looks like it’s time for fans of Adventure Time and citizens of the Land of Ooo to rejoice! An open-world video game featuring many playable characters—including Finn, Jake, BMO, and Marceline—from the hit Cartoon Network show will let you freely traverse the cartoon’s world very soon.

In this new game, called Adventure Time: Pirates of the Enchiridion, players will be able to control Finn and Jake on a pirate ship. The Land of Ooo has been almost completely submerged, separating many of the iconic locations seen in the show by the floodwaters. It’s Finn and Jake’s task to find out what went wrong in this original story by interrogating characters and recruiting some to the playable pirate crew.

This Bandai Namco-published game will feature “tactical combat” and a progression system for the cast of characters. Developer Outright Games is even hosting a competition for fans to name the pirate ship that Finn and Jake will helm on their journey. Adventure Time: Pirates of the Enchiridion will be available for PlayStation 4, Xbox One, Nintendo Switch, and PC in spring of 2018.

Can you see yourself picking this game up? Are you a fan of Adventure Time, and if so, is this the kind of game you’ve always wanted for the franchise? Let us know in the comments below! You can also check out the attached gallery of images to further explore the Land of Ooo to see if this title might be up your alley.

Source: GameSpot

Yes
ChannelImages
Our Verdict
Top

News Nintendo Nintendo Switch

The Next Zelda Game Is Already in Development, With New Ideas Taking Shape

After the colossal critical and commercial success of The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild for Nintendo Switch and Wii U this year, it is no surprise that the next installment in the acclaimed series is already in development, according to series director Eiji Aonuma. We do not know the details about this upcoming title, but the fact that it is beginning development is exciting already to legions of fans!

It is refreshing to know that development has already begun on the next Zelda, especially since development on the DLC for Breath of the Wild was speculated by some fans to have possibly delayed work on the next Zelda. Thankfully, that is not the case. And even more excitingly, the director of Breath of the Wild already has ideas for future games in the series!

“I can’t say at this point if it will be in sequels or in continuations, or what form it will take, but I definitely have lots of ideas and lots of motivation right now. I think while we were working on both the main game and the DLC, it was a process of constantly getting lots of different, new ideas as we refined the game, and finding new things we wanted to do. Even in situations like this, talking to people and finding out that people want to pet dogs gives me a lot of motivation, a lot of ideas for things we could put into the game.” — Hidemaro Fujibayashi, Breath of the Wild game director

Fujibayashi also mentioned in an interview with IGN that it was exciting to work on the DLC for Breath of the Wild because, instead of starting again from mostly nothing, DLC offered the Zelda staff a chance to further refine the world and gameplay they cultivated in this year’s Game of the Year award winner. He even went so far as to say it was like raising one’s own child.

What do you expect to see in the next standalone Zelda title? Do you think it will be similar or connected to Breath of the Wild in some way? What elements from previous Zelda games do you expect to return? Let us know in the comments below, and share your spoiler-free experiences with Breath of the Wild‘s newest DLC, The Champions’ Ballad!

Source: IGN

No
ChannelImages
Our Verdict


Bottom

News PlayStation 4

Hideo Kojima Provides New Gameplay Details for Death Stranding

Death strands; in other words, it reaches new shores and has profound influence on the world around it. Hideo Kojima seems extremely dedicated to getting across the philosophy and nuance of death both in terms of gameplay and story for his new title: the debut for Kojima Productions called Death Stranding. IGN recently interviewed the man and learned so much more to add to the disturbing trailer gamers just received at the 2017 Game Awards.

Kojima spoke of various philosophical and cultural influences for his game. The way game overs, and consequently death, have been handled in gaming has evolved over decades, and Kojima seeks to evolve it further.

“Games started over 40 years ago with arcades. When the player dies, it’s game over. You continue, and time goes back to before you die. You can die as many times as you want, but you always go back to a little bit before you die. That was a mechanic made specifically for putting in coins, and it hasn’t changed since then. One of the themes of this game is life and death. So I want people to realize that when they die in the game, that isn’t the end.” — Hideo Kojima, Death Stranding creator

Apparently, when protagonist Sam goes into the body of water after the explosion in the recent trailer, he ends up in a kind of purgatorial state. Players will be able to control Sam in this area after every death and use the “continue screen” section of the game, as Kojima calls it, to collect items and further prepare for the game. Kojima says that Sam possesses some unique abilities that allow him to explore the world in the way he does. Players will traverse the waters amidst the chaos out of Sam’s own body all while a type of counter ticks down to zero (it’s unclear whether Kojima meant this “counter” as literal, metaphorical, or both). Kojima mentioned that when one finishes playing the first-person purgatorial section of the game, the player returns Sam to his body and resumes with the living experience of the game.

“So as you saw in the trailer, you saw the crater, and when you come back, it’s still there. Most games would’ve taken you back to before the crater was made. So depending on the player, you might have a lot of craters all over the place — depends on each player.” — Hideo Kojima

Another element of the game is Timefall, rain that seems to be able to manipulate time in odd ways. It reportedly makes flowers grow and wilt in an instant, and humans age and deteriorate in a moment as well. Kojima wanted to talk more but was afraid of spilling too many plot details. Suffice to say, the out-of-this-world substance known as Timefall will be crucial to the plot, as will the infants and androids making up the connecting forces of this strange new world.

“Everything makes sense. Everything will come together.” — Hideo Kojima

The IGN exposé linked below goes into even greater detail about Kojima’s ideas regarding fan reactions and how to create a unique action game. Knowing this new information, are you more excited for Kojima’s original game and narrative? Death Stranding seems like it has a long time to come still, but Kojima says the project is on track. Let us know what you would like to see happen in Death Stranding in the comments below!

Source: IGN

No
ChannelImages
Our Verdict
Top

News PlayStation 4 Retro Trailers Videos Virtual Reality

Mega Man in Monster Hunter World Highlights This Year’s PlayStation Experience

The 2017 PlayStation Experience rediscovered many 2018 PlayStation 4 releases and featured in-depth interviews with many developers. Trailers also debuted for many anticipated releases, including Monster Hunter World. One of the biggest parts of this trailer in particular revealed that a 3D model of the 8-bit hero Mega Man will be able to be used as a skin for your Felyne partner, and weapons and abilities from the Mega Man series will make an appearance too!

The Last Guardian was revealed to be getting a virtual reality demo that will be free on the PlayStation Store starting on December 12th. The demo will let players explore a level of the game in VR that is about 20 minutes long, letting you interact with both the world and with Trico.

In other PlayStation news, the new
God of War is in its playtesting phase and is said to be approximately 25 to 35 hours long. The action-adventure revival launches on March 22nd, 2018, or at least that is what the North American PlayStation Store said in a recent update before an added cover-up corrected the date back to December 31st, 2018. Knowing that the game has been said to launch in spring, the March release date sounds likely after all.

Detroit: Become Human was also shown off, with the COO of developer Quantic Dream playing through the title’s first level and using audience input to make decisions of what to investigate and which dialogue options to take. He confirmed that the scene where android protagonist Connor diffuses a tense hostage situation will serve as the game’s very first level, and they reiterated that the game is scheduled to release in spring of 2018.

After the initial PlayStation Experience presentation, Executive Shawn Layden hinted that PlayStation users should be able to
change their PSN names within a year from now. He mentioned that the process for doing so is complex from a technical perspective but that he is having people work on the problem nonetheless.

“I hope we’ll see events occur that you won’t have to ask me that question next PSX,”
— Shawn Layden, PlayStation Interactive President and CEO

What do you think about all this recent PlayStation news? Are you excited about the games coming out in 2018? Let us know in the comments below!

Source: PlayStation Experience 2017

No
ChannelImages
Our Verdict

Bottom

News Nintendo Nintendo Switch

The Nintendo Switch Ports of Bayonetta 1 and 2 Will Support Amiibo and Video Capture

Following the announcement that Bayonetta 1 and 2 will be coming to Nintendo Switch next February, Platinum Games has shared additional details on the new features and improvements these ports will see, including Amiibo support and video capture for up to 30 seconds. Picking up these games either physically or digitally sounds like a great way to prepare for the newly announced Bayonetta 3, which was also revealed at The Game Awards.

In the below press release from Platinum Games, it was announced that the
Super Smash Bros. series Amiibo for Bayonetta will be compatible with these two games. Local cooperative play and other elements are also detailed below.

If you caught this year’s Game Awards, you already know the big news: Bayonetta’s story will continue on the Nintendo Switch with the highly-anticipated Bayonetta 3!

How’s Bayonetta going to get out of this mess? You’ll have to wait and see! Stay tuned for more information on the latest entry in PlatinumGames’ bewitching climax action series.

If you still haven’t met Bayonetta – or just want to revisit her past adventures – worry not! Because Bayonetta and Bayonetta 2 are coming to the Nintendo Switch! Get ready to play these classic PlatinumGames titles at home or on the go on February 16, 2018.

New Features for Bayonetta 2 on the Switch

As Bayonetta 2 comes to the Nintendo Switch, it’s picking up a few extra features!

Local wireless cooperative play

The previously online-only coop Tag Climax is going local! Team up with a friend to take it on – online or off.

amiibo support

Bayonetta 2 for Nintendo Switch will support amiibo, including the Bayonetta amiibo from the Super Smash Bros. series.

Video capture support

Record gameplay videos, starting up to thirty seconds before you press the capture button. Share videos from your Switch’s Album to Facebook and Twitter to show the world your skills!

Bayonetta and Bayonetta 2 will be available separately on the Nintendo eShop in North America, Europe and Australia from February 16. Purchasing one will give you a discount on the other.

A packaged edition of Bayonetta 2 will also be available at retail stores and will include a download code for the digital edition of Bayonetta

Video capture support

Record gameplay videos, starting up to thirty seconds before you press the capture button. Share videos from your Switch’s Album to Facebook and Twitter to show the world your skills!

Bayonetta and Bayonetta 2 will be available separately on the Nintendo eShop in North America, Europe and Australia from February 16. Purchasing one will give you a discount on the other.

A packaged edition of Bayonetta 2 will also be available at retail stores and will include a download code for the digital edition of Bayonetta

What do you think about these additional features? Will you be picking up
Bayonetta and Bayonetta 2 on the Nintendo Switch, or have you played the action gems already? Let us know in the comments below!

Source: Platinum Games

No
ChannelImages
Our Verdict
Top

News Nintendo Nintendo Switch

North America’s Next Splatfest for Splatoon 2 Pits Christmas Sweaters Versus Socks

Which gaudy holiday gift would you rather receive? The North American Splatfest for the Splatoon 2 holiday season will be focusing on that very question, as it pits those who would prefer Christmas sweaters against those in favor of Christmas socks. The Splatfest will begin on Friday, December 15th at 9:00 PM PT, and you can choose your team now!

Teams in Europe and Japan are currently fighting their own Splatfests this weekend, with the topics of contention being quite different from what Americans will be facing. The European Splatfest has had players choose between films and books, while Japan pit Inklings against each other to fight over Uniqlo merchandise, specifically whether warm innerwear or toasty outerwear is better for the winter season.

Which Splatfest is your favorite? Will you be participating in the coming weekend’s? Let us know in the comments below!

Source: Tumblr

No
ChannelImages
Our Verdict
Top

News PC PlayStation 4 Trailers Videos Xbox One

Metro: Exodus Gets a Haunting New Trailer at The Game Awards

The world of Metro: Exodus looks more frightening and unlivable every time it’s shown off. The Xbox One, PlayStation 4, and PC game was detailed in its harsh post-nuclear landscape of snow and recognizable Metro franchise mutants. The overlying narration sounds melancholy and ominous, and there is plenty of time for more excitement to brew before the game drops in fall of 2018.

Check out the brand new trailer above! How is this new
Metro title looking to you?

Source: The Game Awards 2017

No
ChannelImages
Our Verdict

Top

Indie News PlayStation 4 Trailers Videos Virtual Reality

From the Creators of Job Simulator, Vacation Simulator Looks to Be a Whimsical Escape

Before The 2017 Game Awards began, the creators of Job Simulator shared with host Geoff Keighley that their next project—titled Vacation Simulator—will be headed to PlayStation VR next year. A controllable human character will be able to interact with robot companions on a colorful beach, and that alone seems intriguing.

Check out the trailer above! What do you think of this new VR experience?

Source: The Game Awards 2017

No
ChannelImages
Our Verdict

Top

News PlayStation 4 Trailers Videos

Possibilities Seem Endless in the New Dreams Trailer from Media Molecule

Media Molecule, the developers of the LittleBigPlanet series, is ready to bring their new creation into life in 2018. Dreams for PlayStation 4 received a new trailer at The Game Awards, and it shows off a breadth of gameplay ideas, from a prepared story players will be able to experience to tons of creation tools for the players to create their own games and stories.

You can watch the full trailer above!

Source: The Game Awards 2017

No
ChannelImages
Our Verdict

Top

News PlayStation 4 Trailers Videos

Death Stranding Continues Giving The Game Awards Viewers Nightmares With a New Trailer

We got another look at Kojima Production’s Death Stranding featuring Norman Reedus at the 2017 Game Awards. Still without a release date or actual gameplay shown, all there is to go off of is this extended new trailer with creepy imagery and interesting narrative questions.

You can watch the full Game Awards trailer above! What do you think of this latest look at Hideo Kojima’s newest title?

Source: The Game Awards 2017

No
ChannelImages
Our Verdict

Top

News Nintendo Nintendo Switch Trailers Videos

Both Original Bayonetta Games Are Headed to Switch in One Package

As if the announcement of Bayonetta 3 being a Nintendo Switch exclusive wasn’t enough, Bayonetta 2 is being ported to the system along with the original game just as the Wii U title did back in 2014. Players will be able to play cooperatively with separate Joy-Con in Bayonetta 2 as well! The games launch on one cartridge together on February 16, 2018.

Source: The Game Awards 2017

No
ChannelImages
Our Verdict

Top

News PlayStation 4 Trailers Videos

Star Wars Battlefront II’s The Last Jedi Season Releases Before the Film, on December 13th

Star Wars Battlefront II is already getting its first of multiple seasons of free DLC. Starting on December 13th, players will be able to control hero/villain characters Finn and Captain Phasma from the sequel trilogy in preparation for Star Wars: The Last Jedi, which comes to movie theaters on December 15th. The old rebel base on the planet Crait will be the newest map in the multiplayer. On top of that, Iden Versio’s story continues in DLC for the campaign, which also leads into the upcoming film.

Source: The Game Awards 2017

No
ChannelImages
Our Verdict

Top

Indie News Trailers Videos

The Creators of Firewatch Reveal Their Next Project, “In the Valley of Gods”

Firewatch was a huge story-driven indie success of 2016, and now the developers at Campo Santo have a new game in the works. In the Valley of Gods was revealed as their next release, due for launch in 2019. The game will feature an animated duo exploring what looks to be ancient Egyptian ruins in the days of old film cameras.

Source: The Game Awards 2017

No
ChannelImages
Our Verdict

Top

News PC PlayStation 4 Trailers Videos Xbox One

World War Z Is Getting a Video Game Adaptation

The pre-show for the 2017 Game Awards kicked into a higher gear with the announcement that the famous story of World War Z will be getting a video game adaptation for Xbox One, PlayStation 4 and PC. The gameplay looks reminiscent of the upcoming Days Gone for PlayStation 4, and I guess we will see if the game is more faithful to the novel than the Brad Pitt film was.

Check out the trailer above!

Source: The Game Awards 2017

No
ChannelImages
Our Verdict

Top

Features Indie Nintendo Retro

Crafting Difficulty in Games Is a Balancing Act Between Frustration and Satisfaction

Difficulty. It is something that no entertainment medium other than video games has to contend with. Our input as players defines our experiences with our games, in particular how challenging they are. One need only be present for a song or movie to finish in order to get the full experience. In order to get through a game however, one must be skilled enough to adapt to the requirements of whatever game is being played to “win” in the end. Some games give us fairer challenges than others, and it is in evolving game design where either frustration or satisfaction on behalf of the player are born.

The difference in fairness actually started as early as our industry’s arcade and NES-hard roots. Take early Nintendo and RareWare examples of Super Mario Bros.: The Lost Levels and Battletoads respectively. The poison mushroom from the original Super Mario sequel is a classic example of an unfair trap, similar in appearance to the usual power-up that makes Mario bigger and allows him to take one hit before dying. In this sequel, to spice things up, the developers thought it would be smart to betray the trust of the player and have it kill Mario instead. It may be amusing today, but looking back, poison mushrooms are a perfect example of a time waster: an artificial difficulty add-on that adds no real substance to the game.

Battletoads, as hard as it may be in many respects, actually respects skill instead of random chance. The rules of the game are usually defined; even the famous motorbike levels can be based on a player’s reaction time. It is hard as hell to react after seeing an obstacle coming for only a mere fraction of a second, but at least there are rules that can be understood by a hardened player with a desire to beat this, one of the most famous examples of NES-hard.

Interestingly enough, challenge in games has largely stayed the same, relying on these two methods of implementing it on behalf of the developers. Random bullshit and rule-based reactions or strategies provide us as players with obstacles we must overcome, and in my opinion, the former usually makes for frustration while the latter gives us satisfaction once we overcome a challenge, at least as long as we like the core game itself.

Take the Mario Kart series and its infamous blue shell for an example of luck-based crap. Sure, the vague rule is that this first-place ruining item can come tear up your day at any time, but before the horn-using days of Mario Kart 8, the item was practically unavoidable, leaving destruction in its wake for many awesome racers. Now, I also believe that Mario Kart gets away with being unfair in this way at times because of the novelty of it being a gut-busting party game, similar to the love-it and/or hate-it Mario Party series. This being said, we usually experience frustration when the blue shell comes our way because there is so little we can do within the rules to avoid it.

Platformers, as cited in The Lost Levels above, can also earn a reputation for throwing unfair crap at the player. To cite a game that implements challenge within the rules in a good way, however, my favorite 2D platformer—Wii U title Donkey Kong Country: Tropical Freeze—handles its difficulty in a way that is satisfying. The Donkey Kong Country series usually handles its levels in a classy manner, beyond the occasional curveball (found mostly in the SNES days).

Take mine cart levels, in which you cannot see things coming until a second before they are about to reach you, or the frost-covered versions of DK’s home island. There are apparent rules at play, making it obvious that reaction time and precise handling of the characters are paramount. And since these different types of levels are designed well enough to teach players the new tricks that stages throw at them as the challenge increases, even dying does not feel like that bad of an experience because getting steadily better and better is a reward in itself (addicting level design and controls help too, of course). One does not get better at being creamed by the blue shell on the final lap. But one can make it all the way through Sawmill Thrill in one piece, even on the first try. And even if only true legends can do that, at least it feels possible to other players.

This is at least what I think about when I consider what frustrates me and satisfies me in terms of in-game difficulty. Something that teaches me and that allows me to pinpoint where I went wrong spurs me onward to face the challenge and perform better. Being ruthlessly blasted with blue shells or being forced to digest poison mushrooms out of inexperience or simple chance teaches me that life is unfair, which is frustrating. I mean, don’t we play video games in part to escape the real world and feel like we are in control? I think so.

But I also want to know what you think about video game difficulty. Let us hear your thoughts in the comments below!

No
ChannelImages
Our Verdict
Top

Features Mobile Platforms Nintendo

Animal Crossing: Pocket Camp Fits Smart Devices as Nintendo’s Best Mobile Adaptation

For a free game, Animal Crossing: Pocket Camp accomplishes a remarkable amount: being able to appeal to millions of players who have never played an Animal Crossing game before, introducing new elements to the franchise, creating a streamlined version of seeing more design options and animal friends than ever before in a relatively short period of time, and simplifying gameplay for all ages and interest levels. Without further ado, let’s go camping!

Those who have played Animal Crossing games before know that the gameplay is rather simple. Fishing, bug catching, gathering fruit, and using other tools are all controlled with a singular button, and thus by singular taps in Pocket Camp. Since materials are more important than ever in the mobile title, gathering the staples of the Animal Crossing world requires a little less strategy. The game literally tells the player to tap when the time is right. This may seem too elementary, but for what this mobile game is supposed to be—an amusing and even sometimes tantalizing distraction—instructions enforce what matters in this game: instant gratification.

As such, this game is by no means a New Leaf, in which progress and planning for that 3DS title felt like it equated into more meaningful accomplishments and relationships down the road. No, instead Pocket Camp delivers an experience I think both veterans and newcomers to the series can get behind. For those who have played games in the franchise before, Pocket Camp provides a streamlined way to perhaps meet villagers they have never seen in action before.

It also provides a relatively cheap way to access loads of different furniture sets, because Cyrus the alpaca crafts them from easily accessed bells and materials. Real-life currency can translate into Leaf Tickets to speed up this process even further, but even without spending any cash, players can experience new parts of Animal Crossing quicker than ever by logging in on their phones a few times per day after the hours of crafting pass or when new prospective campers show up.

This evolving landscape of the campgrounds appeals to newcomers too; looking up the game at different times usually provides something slightly different. A new cat or dog may appear at Breezy Hollow, or a new event like the currently ongoing Jingle-themed festivities may begin. Every action has a significant reaction in Pocket Camp, meaning that helping out an animal or collecting fish, bugs, seashells, and fruit will always get the player closer to unlocking something new, whether it be through animals’ requests or the cycling reward system that gives out new materials automatically when milestones are reached.

This perpetuates the self-serving style of gameplay this quick and easy version of Animal Crossing is going for, and I must say, it all makes a lot of sense for a mobile game that many are likely to—and should—pick up for short bursts of amusement every once in a while. Fittingly enough, this game is not built for long play sessions, but for a game in which the days are always changing, Pocket Camp is smartly designed enough to court all kinds of animal lovers throughout our days too.

What about you? Have you picked up Pocket Camp, and what do you think about this title as a mobile venture? Share your friend codes with other commenters and get ready for Toy Day coming this month!

No
ChannelImages
Our Verdict
Top

Features PlayStation 4 Reviews

Star Wars Battlefront II Shines the Brightest in its Compelling Single-Player Campaign

Yes, there is actually a game behind all the controversy surrounding the microtransactions the world cannot stop speaking about. As a disclaimer, this review will focus solely on the microtransactions-free single player campaign of Star Wars Battlefront II. The multiplayer seems to be an addicting setup for Star Wars fans who have self-control enough to not spend their hard-earned cash on elements (with some time) unlocked otherwise through playtime, but for nerds like me, the single-player game is a refreshing break from the hectic, wily realm of multiplayer for a canon tale worthy of the famous brand.

Single-Player Campaign

Star Wars Battlefront II has the player take control of Iden Versio, leader of the Imperial Inferno Squad, for the majority of its several hour-long campaign. The premise: Iden and her men become disillusioned with the Empire after the destruction of the second Death Star (as seen in Return of the Jedi) and other traumatic events, leading to a riveting yet easy-to-follow plot of wavering allegiances and a changing galaxy leading to the currently-running sequel trilogy.

As such, there are surprises aplenty for the average Star Wars fan, and for the most hardcore of enthusiasts, Battlefront II offers Easter eggs and other intricacies that tie into the current Star Wars canon more seamlessly than the Legends brand of Star Wars ever did. Controlling characters such as Luke Skywalker and Han Solo in interludes dispersed throughout Iden’s story feels natural and progresses the narrative in a complex way beyond just the perspective of special ops Imperial soldiers.

The story is solid enough, and so is the gameplay for the most part. The core structure of the original EA Battlefront is refined here, featuring equippable items for trigger buttons that can distract and harm enemy units in multiple ways. Stealth-inclined players may want to use smoke to their advantage; for example the dense shroud of trees on the forest moon of Endor could provide additional cover to allow for stealth takedowns with the press of a stick. Trigger-happy players may opt for thermal detonators that recharge instead of being restrained to an ammo counter. Blasters can overheat as well, but when they do, a brief minigame appears onscreen, and after the correctly timed press of a button, overheated blasters can actually turn into an advantage. This risk-reward style of fighting keeps things moving and provides a variety of different strategies for different kinds of players.

Movement can be a little clunky unfortunately. Iden cannot roll in the campaign, which stuck out as a sore point early on. However, things pick up again in the assorted Rogue Squadron-esque flight missions featuring iconic spacecraft: X-Wings, TIE fighters, and the Millennium Falcon. It’s not conducive for those yearning for arcade-style flight like in Star Fox, but after some getting used to (and customatization featuring inverted flight controls and 360-degree movement), turning around and upside down, shooting proton torpedoes, and taking down other fighters feels very satisfying.

Lightsaber combat comes into play too and leaves a little to be desired. Using triggers to zoom and shoot a blaster makes perfect sense, but slashing in predetermined moves with the right trigger is not as exciting. Some Force attributes such as freezing and pushing opponents with the Force with face buttons makes up for lackluster Lightsaber options, but I still prefer shooting up troops in Battlefront II any day.

This campaign is not incredibly long, featuring a dozen variety-filled missions with various characters, planets, and control types getting the spotlight. Like with most shooters with a campaign, the single-player venture in this game really is a great insight into what the more fully fleshed out multiplayer of Battlefront II has to offer. Thankfully, beautifully rendered and acted cutscenes help make the experience more rewarding. Some may be surprised by the narrative turns, but for me, that surprise was welcomed and worthwhile for a Star Wars fan.

The Verdict

Star Wars Battlefront II has a movie’s level of quality put into the campaign, making it the most exciting cinematic experience in a Star Wars video game in many years. For fans of the entire franchise, the fact that Iden’s quest is canon to the current chronology of Star Wars makes it all the sweeter. The galaxy feels lived in, as it always does, and being able to interact in some of the most famous battles post-Return of the Jedi is a lot of fun. This is a must-have for all Star Wars fans. For all others, Battlefront II is still a fun romp and average third-person shooter on the PlayStation 4. Just don’t waste your real-life money on the microtransactions, and be happy that more DLC for both the campaign and multiplayer are coming for free in the coming months!

No
ChannelImages
7
Our Verdict
Star Wars Battlefront II (Single-Player Campaign)
Riveting campaign with original characters in events after Return of the Jedi and before The Force Awakens; satisfying combat mechanics for both soldiers and hero/villain characters; more maps and solid modes than the original EA Battlefront.
Steep unlock requirements for those who do not plan to give their lives to this game; nonsensical structural rules for online matches such as stacking teams through random assortment and hardly penalizing players for quitting mid-match; lightsaber combat feels like it should be more in-depth than pressing the right trigger.
Top