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News Nintendo Nintendo Switch Videos

Rumor: Miyamoto and Aonuma are Addicted to Crypt of the NecroDancer

During the most recent Nindies Showcase, we were surprised to learn that Nintendo is lending one of their most popular franchises to an indie developer for a crossover game. Brace Yourself Games, developers of Crypt of the NecroDancer, are making a Hyrule-themed sequel called Cadence of Hyrule. So how did this partnership come about?

Game Informer set out to find the answer to this question. Ben Hanson inquired about the process in a Nindies interview with Nintendo’s Kirk Scott, and he was told that the process is “organic.” Scott said that indies shouldn’t just reach out to Nintendo and ask, but that they might, for instance, run into a Nintendo producer at a bar and strike up a conversation.

Imran Khan then put forward a different scenario. Khan claims he was contacted by “someone who would know” that gave him the real scoop on Cadence of Hyrule. According to Khan’s unnamed source, the real reason Brace Yourself Games got to work with the Zelda IP is that Zelda creator Shigeru Miyamoto and producer Eiji Aonuma are huge fans of Crypt of the NecroDancer. Khan says the duo became addicted to the game after its release on Switch and decided they had to get in contact with the developers.

Obviously, Nintendo and Brace Yourself Games have not confirmed the validity of this story, but if true that must be a huge ego boost for the NecroDancer team. Miyamoto has inspired and excited countless developers over the years, so getting him addicted to your game to the point that he wants to hand you the reigns to Zelda is quite the achievement!

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News Nintendo Nintendo Switch Wii U

Nintendo Went Through 100 Link Designs for Breath of the Wild

Breath of the Wild brought a lot of changes to the classic Zelda formula, bringing it more in line with some modern action-RPGs. The latest Zelda adventure also brought changes to Link himself, as the character was redesigned to look more gender neutral and traded in his standard green tunic for a blue one.

Series producer Eiji Aonuma discussed these changes, along with art director Satoru Takizawa and art designer Yoshiyuki Oyama, in the recently translated Zelda art book. Tasked with making Link look cool (but not too cool), updating his look for a new audience, and making him “exude a sense of adventure,” the team went to work.

“Link is the game’s protagonist, so I’ve always thought we need him to look cool. Yet, if we overdo it, the people playing the game might feel like they’re controlling an already accomplished hero, which I felt could get in the way of the players immersing themselves in the game. For that reason, this time I decided we should make Link a more neutral character in a variety of ways.

“We thought that the iconic green tunic and hat had become expected, so we wanted to mix things up and update his look. Interestingly, though, nobody on the team said, ‘Let’s make him blue!’ It just organically ended up that way.”
— Eiji Aonuma

“Producer Aonuma-san declared that we would be revising expectations by updating Link for this game. He wanted Link to be a more neutral character that players could see themselves as. You can feel how energized and excited the artists were about this idea from the really interesting modern concepts they drew. There were close to one hundred designs presented within the team for Link, and the number of sketches was too great to count.” —
Satoru Takizawa

“The Link of this game was to be a traveler from the frontier who exudes a sense of adventure, which is why there are a lot of designs that feature capes and bags. At the beginning of development we drew a lot of landscape concepts. Link wearing blue clothes appeared pretty early on because the blue stood out against the backgrounds we were producing.

“Did you notice that the Champion’s Tunic that appears on page 60 (see below) has a different pattern on the chest than the one from the start of development? Since the tunic is unique to Link, it ultimately ended up being a symbolic representation of the Master Sword. The story behind the Champion’s Tunic is touched upon in the second DLC, ‘The Champions’ Ballad.'”” —
Yoshiyuki Oyama

Nintendo was so committed to getting Link’s new look right that they considered around 100 different versions before settling on the final Link we see in the game. You might think ditching the green tunic would have been a big deal internally, but apparently his fancy new blue tunic just happened to be a common and popular look among those variations. Are you happy with how the Hero of Hyrule turned out?

Source: Nintendo Everything

News Nintendo Nintendo Switch Wii

Nintendo Spokesperson Denies Skyward Sword for Switch

Following the HD remasters of Wind Waker and Twilight Princess, many Zelda fans were hoping that Skyward Sword would be next in line. According to attendees of a recent Zelda concert in Japan, series producer Eiji Aonuma even teased Skyward Sword for Switch during the event. So can we expect an official announcement soon?

Well, not so fast. After reporting on this story, Eurogamer managed to get a follow-up comment from a Nintendo spokesperson, and it wasn’t exactly promising. The Nintendo rep told Eurogamer ”
At this time we have no plans to release The Legend of Zelda: Skyward Sword on Nintendo Switch.”

So the official word is currently “no,” but I wouldn’t say that’s cause to lose hope altogether. Aonuma has been known to tease things ahead of time (although usually in a much more subtle way), and Nintendo has been known to drop the ”
no plans” PR line when an in-development product leaks ahead of time. I wouldn’t exactly hold my breath, but it’s still possible that it’s on the way and Aonuma simply jumped the gun on teasing it.

Source: Eurogamer

News Nintendo Nintendo Switch Wii

Rumor: Zelda’s Producer Teases Skyward Sword for Switch

Last generation, Nintendo revisited two Zelda games from the GameCube era, and the result was HD versions of Wind Waker and Twilight Princess. Skyward Sword, the next console Zelda in line after those two, has not yet received the same treatment. Many have speculated that this could change on Switch, with the Joy-Con controllers replacing the Wii Motion Plus controllers originally required for the game.

Nintendo has yet to make any official announcement in this area, but according to recent rumblings from Japan, Zelda producer Eiji Aonuma just threw some major fuel on that flame. According to numerous attendees of a recent Zelda concert in Osaka Japan, Aonuma addressed the crowd and said “We know what you are thinking. Skyward Sword on Switch, right?

While we obviously can’t confirm that this occurred, it’s being claimed by many different people who attended the concert, so it seems likely to be true. We also know that the Zelda development team once experimented with some concepts for Skyward Sword HD years ago, so there’s definitely been interest on Nintendo’s end.

Could we see an announcement soon? With The Game Awards just around the corner, it’s certainly a possibility. Personally, I’d love to see a bundle with the HD versions of Wind Waker, Twilight Princess, and Skyward Sword all packaged together.

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Nintendo Will Never Reveal Breath of the Wild’s Timeline Placement

Nintendo’s beloved Legend of Zelda franchise has been churning out hit games non-stop for over 30 years, and that has led to a rather complicated, convoluted, and sometimes contradicting overarching storyline. A few years back, Nintendo released an official chronology that confirmed the existence of three separate timelines.

We know that Breath of the Wild takes place more than 10,000 years after most of the other games, but which timeline does it call home? Fans have been speculating and debating this question since before the game launched, and there are still many opposing schools of thought. Meanwhile, Nintendo has yet to offer clarification, and they likely never will.

The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild – Creating a Champion, an officially licensed book that goes behind the scenes of the game’s creation, features quotes from Zelda producer Eiji Aonuma. Here’s what he had to say on the subject of Breath of the Wild‘s place in the Zelda timeline.

“In books like the recently released The Legend of Zelda Encyclopedia, we revealed where each Zelda game fell on a timeline and how their stories related, but we didn’t do that for Breath of the Wild. There is a reason for that. With this game, we saw just how many players were playing in their own way and had those reactions I just mentioned.

“We realized that people were enjoying imagining the story that emerged from the fragmental imagery we were providing. If we defined a restricted timeline, then there would be a definitive story, and it would eliminate the room for imagination, which wouldn’t be as fun.

“We want players to be able to continue having fun imagining this world even after they are finished with the game, so, this time, we decided that we would avoid making clarifications. I hope that everyone can find their own answer, in their own way.”
— Eiji Aonuma

So when does Link’s latest Hyrulean adventure take place exactly? Nintendo isn’t saying! Aonuma has enjoyed seeing people try to piece together the truth from the various clues left in the game, and he’s decided to keep it that way. Rather than confirming its placement, Aonuma believes it’s better for fans to decide for themselves.

Personally, I think this is a wonderful decision, and I personally called for Nintendo to do exactly this two years ago. I think it’s a fitting choice, given the nature of the game, and it also gives Nintendo more creative freedom going forward. Whatever follows Breath of the Wild doesn’t need to confine itself to a specific timeline. By setting the game’s events over 10,000 years in the future, there’s enough ambiguity that Nintendo can take the story wherever they want, and fans can just fill in the blanks.

Source: Nintendo Insider

News Nintendo Nintendo Switch Wii U

Nintendo Power is Coming Back as an Official Nintendo Podcast

Back in 2012, Nintendo’s official magazine, Nintendo Power, released its final issue, after more than 24 years of providing news and strategies for fans across North America. The magazine’s discontinuation was a somber moment for many who grew up with it, and in the five years since, some have tried to revive the spirit of the magazine with new publications, including Nintendo Force. However, a few days ago, Nintendo announced that Nintendo Power is finally coming back—only this time, as an official Nintendo podcast.

Nintendo Power is hosted by Chris Slate, the former editor-in-chief of Nintendo Power, along with Kit Ellis from Nintendo Minute and Damon Baker from Nintendo of America. Its first episode, “Nintendo Switch Year in Review,” has already been released; you can listen to it right here. The episode’s main focus is a nice long interview with Zelda producer Eiji Aonuma and director Hidemaro Fujibayashi, who discuss the performance of The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild. Although some fans may still miss the original magazine, the podcast sounds great so far.

What do you guys think of the first episode? Are you glad to see Nintendo Power making a return, even if not as a magazine? Let us know in the comments below!

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News Nintendo Nintendo Switch

The Next Zelda Game Is Already in Development, With New Ideas Taking Shape

After the colossal critical and commercial success of The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild for Nintendo Switch and Wii U this year, it is no surprise that the next installment in the acclaimed series is already in development, according to series director Eiji Aonuma. We do not know the details about this upcoming title, but the fact that it is beginning development is exciting already to legions of fans!

It is refreshing to know that development has already begun on the next Zelda, especially since development on the DLC for Breath of the Wild was speculated by some fans to have possibly delayed work on the next Zelda. Thankfully, that is not the case. And even more excitingly, the director of Breath of the Wild already has ideas for future games in the series!

“I can’t say at this point if it will be in sequels or in continuations, or what form it will take, but I definitely have lots of ideas and lots of motivation right now. I think while we were working on both the main game and the DLC, it was a process of constantly getting lots of different, new ideas as we refined the game, and finding new things we wanted to do. Even in situations like this, talking to people and finding out that people want to pet dogs gives me a lot of motivation, a lot of ideas for things we could put into the game.” — Hidemaro Fujibayashi, Breath of the Wild game director

Fujibayashi also mentioned in an interview with IGN that it was exciting to work on the DLC for Breath of the Wild because, instead of starting again from mostly nothing, DLC offered the Zelda staff a chance to further refine the world and gameplay they cultivated in this year’s Game of the Year award winner. He even went so far as to say it was like raising one’s own child.

What do you expect to see in the next standalone Zelda title? Do you think it will be similar or connected to Breath of the Wild in some way? What elements from previous Zelda games do you expect to return? Let us know in the comments below, and share your spoiler-free experiences with Breath of the Wild‘s newest DLC, The Champions’ Ballad!

Source: IGN

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News Nintendo

The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild Wins Game of the Year at The Game Awards 2017

Many Nintendo fans have been predicting it since the highly praised game came out earlier this year, but Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild just won the 2017 Game of the Year Award. This marks Nintendo’s first Game of the Year award since the The Game Awards started in 2014. Eiji Aonuma took to the stage to thank the fans and the entire development team. He also promised to take the energy from winning this award and use it to continue making Zelda games in the future.

The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild was in contention with Persona 5, Horizon Zero Dawn, Super Mario Odyssey, and PlayerUnknown’s Battlegrounds.

Many other games and people won other awards tonight, including Breath of the Wild. The awards are as follows:

  • Trending gamer: Guy Beahm (Dr. Disrespect)
  • Best Score in Music: Nier: Automata
  • Best Mobile Game: Monument Valley 2
  • Best VR/AR Game: Resident Evil VII
  • Best Handheld Game: Metroid: Samus Returns
  • Best Narrative: What Remains of Edith Finch?
  • Best Action Game: Wolfenstein II: The New Colossus
  • Best Art Direction: Cuphead
  • Industry Icon Award: Carol Shaw
  • Best RPG: Persona 5
  • Best Strategy Game: Mario + Rabbids: Kingdom Battle
  • Most Anticipated Game: The Last of Us Part II
  • Best Family Game: Super Mario Odyssey
  • Best eSports Team: Cloud9
  • Best eSports Game: Overwatch
  • Best Indie Game: Cuphead
  • Best Ongoing Game: Overwatch
  • Best eSports Player: Faker
  • Best Student Game: Level Squared
  • Games for Impact: Hellblade: Senua’s Sacrifice
  • Best Audio Design: Hellblade: Senua’s Sacrifice
  • Best Performance: Melina Juergens as Senua (Hellblade: Senua’s Sacrifice)
  • Best Fighting Game: Injustice 2
  • Best Game Direction: The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild
  • Best Action-Adventure Game: The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild
  • Best Sports/Racing Game: Forza Motorsport 7
  • Chinese Fan Game Award: jx3 HD

What did you guys think of The Game Awards? Did your favorite games win this year? Let us know what you think in the comments below!

Source: The Game Awards 2017

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News Nintendo Nintendo Switch Wii U

Breath of the Wild Sets the New Standard for Future Zelda Games

The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild continues to be a huge hit for Nintendo, in part due to its fresh take on the storied franchise. Fans better get used to this feel if a recent interview is any indication. Zelda producer Eiji Aonuma recently discussed the future of the franchise with Famitsu, and although the publication won’t release until tomorrow, early translations have made their way to the internet.

In response to a question about future
Zelda games would be like, Aonuma stated that he believes the “open air” concept will become the new standard for future Zelda titles:

Famitsu: Making the next Zelda game might be more difficult if you choose to make it an open-air game. What will evolve open-air? How will you make future dungeons? What will the next Zelda title be like?

Aonuma: I think that, in the future, open air games will be the standard for Zelda.

Personally, I’m not sure I’m as sold on the concept as Aonuma is, though it’s certainly hard to argue with success. What do you think about
Breath of the Wild being the standard for the Zelda franchise? What would you like to see change going forward?

Source: Famitsu (via GoNintendo)

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News Nintendo Nintendo Switch Videos Wii U

Get a Thirty-Minute Look Behind the Scenes of Zelda: Breath of the Wild in Nintendo’s Latest Videos

Many of you have probably been spending a healthy (or unhealthy) amount of time with The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild. Whether you’re still exploring the Great Plateau or ready to face Calamity Ganon now, there’s no denying Hyrule’s latest adventure definitely had a lot of care and effort put into it. If you’re wondering just how much work the game took and what the creation process was like, Nintendo has you covered.

Today, Nintendo uploaded a three-part video series in which Producer Eiji Aonuma and other Zelda staff describe the making of Breath of the Wild. In the first video, they describe early attempts to break early Zelda conventions (many of which were due to console limitations), even showing footage of the 2D Zelda prototype they used to brainstorm ideas. Another video covers the difficulties of building a story in the game’s “open-air” progression style, and then they discuss designing characters such as Link, Princess Zelda, various enemies, and even a cancelled idea for towns and NPCs inspired by The Minish Cap. The third one offers more insight into the open-air style and how it was inspired by shortcomings in previous titles, also showing how the physics, combat, and even the sound effects and ambient music appeal to this concept. You can hear about all of this and more by checking out all three videos below.

What do you guys think of this video series and of Breath of the Wild overall? Do you wish any of these scrapped ideas had made the final game? Let us know in the comments below!

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News Nintendo Nintendo Switch Wii U

Zelda’s Producer Reveals Which Non-Nintendo Games Most Inspired Breath of the Wild

Many Zelda fans have noticed that Breath of the Wild seems to take inspiration from Western RPGs. This might not be a coincidence, as series producer Eiji Aonuma revealed in a recent interview that he actually played a lot of Western games while developing Zelda. He listed games like Far Cry, The Witcher III, and The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim as some recent favorites. However, he mentioned titles like Grand Theft Auto were too violent for him. Aonuma noted that in the past, he hasn’t played very many games, but then realized it wasn’t right of him to do so as a game developer.

“In the past I didn’t play many video games. But then I realized, this isn’t right, I have to. So nowadays, I actually play a lot of overseas titles. While playing those games, I do find some ideas, but it’s not that it connects directly to Zelda to where I would take something and use it in Zelda, but it’s more of something I keep in the back of my head while developing the game.”
— Eiji Aonuma

He also went on to mention that he has been friends with Fumito Uedo, director of
The Last Guardian, for some time, and that Uedo sent him a copy when his new game was finally finished. While Breath of the Wild isn’t necessarily inspired by the game, Aonuma was deeply impressed by it and thought it was neat that the games he and his friend made featured some coincidentally similar gameplay mechanics:

“Flying in the sky is very similar to paragliding in Breath of the Wild, so it kind of made me feel like, we’re friends, and we’re kind of doing a similar thing.”
— Eiji Aonuma

It is pretty neat to hear when game developers take notes from other titles, and it’s no surprise that Aonuma may have had Western RPGs in mind to a degree during
Breath of the Wild development. What do you guys think of this? Is Zelda better off with these new inspirations? Should the series continue to take elements from other franchises? Let us know what you think in the comments below!

Source: Game Informer

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News Nintendo Nintendo Switch Wii U

Yes, Link Can Wear His Famous Green Tunic in Zelda: Breath of the Wild

We’re less than two weeks away from The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild‘s official launch, and we still have yet to see Link wearing the Hero of Hyrule’s legendary green tunic.

Last June,
Shigeru Miyamoto expressed concern that Breath of the Wild‘s new equipment system, which plays an important role in its gameplay, might be overlooked by players who simply want Link to wear his green tunic all the time. He wouldn’t say whether the iconic outfit is present—though we here at Gamnesia believed he was keeping quiet so as to keep it a surprise when players finally discover the outfit in-game. But Zelda producer Eiji Aonuma has finally confirmed that the Hero’s clothes are indeed available to players.

This news comes from Nintendo France’s Twitter account, where Eiji Aonuma is appearing for daily Q&A videos about
Breath of the Wild.

There’s still no word on how or when players may encounter Link’s green tunic, nor what gameplay properties it may hold.

Source: Nintendo France

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News Nintendo Nintendo Switch

Aonuma Gives 2D Zelda Fans Hope for a New Game on Nintendo Switch

Tons of people are excited for the upcoming Nintendo title The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild. However, some fans are wondering if a new 2D Zelda game is on the way. We haven’t seen a true 2D single-player adventure from the series since 2013’s A Link Between Worlds, so fans are itching to go back to the classic feel of the older titles. Aonuma addressed these concerns in a recent interview with Game Informer, saying that “there is definitely a possibility” of a new game in this style coming to the Nintendo Switch in the future.

Aonuma was first asked if he would merge the handheld and console
Zelda teams to help the speed of development. He seemed to be against the idea, explaining that development would not necessarily go faster if there were a bunch of people working on the same project.

“The 3DS team and the Wii U team have different approaches to game development, so I don’t necessarily want to combine them and have them think together, but rather have each think about what they can bring to Nintendo Switch from their own perspective.”
— Eiji Aonuma

He further explained that the handheld team would still be around to develop for the Nintendo 3DS and that the Switch’s release would not impact their creations. Aonuma also expressed love for the 2D style, saying there are many different ideas that are better done in that kind of world and that the team is looking to evolve it in the future:

“There are definitely good things about the 2D world and the playstyles of the 2D world. There are a lot of fans who enjoy that style. This Nintendo Switch style, which is the evolved style of gameplay is not necessarily… I want you to think of it more as an evolved style of 2D style. For the 3DS team, I am trying to make them think in a more evolved 2D-style approach.”
— Eiji Aonuma

What do you guys think of this? Would you like to see a 2D
Zelda game make its way to Nintendo Switch? Discuss in the comments below!

Source: Game Informer

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News Nintendo Virtual Reality

Don’t Get Your Hopes Up for a Zelda Game in VR

Nintendo is the only video game company with hardware that doesn’t have confirmed virtual reality support. Many speculate that the Nintendo Switch might be able to slide into a VR headset, based on some recent patents, but Nintendo hasn’t been too keen on the idea so far. But even if Nintendo does eventually make VR games, you shouldn’t be too hopeful to see the Zelda games use it. Producer Eiji Aonuma doesn’t seem to be interested in the technology, saying it wouldn’t work to well with the series.

“You know, one of the interests of the Zelda games is to evolve Link and therefore see him grow. In VR, you would no longer see Link, you would see the world from your personal point of view, so I think it would not be very ‘Zelda.'” — Eiji Aonuma

While Aonuma doesn’t seem to think Zelda would work in virtual reality, there are many fan projects that let you play some of the classic games with added VR functionality. Until Nintendo decides to embrace this new technology, we’ll have to rely on these projects to keep our dreams of running around in a green tunic while cutting grass with our swords a reality.

What do you guys think of this? Is it finally time for Nintendo to join the VR race? Should they stick to keeping their games traditional? Let us know your thoughts in the comments below!

Source: Gameblog (via Nintendo Everything)

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News Nintendo Nintendo Switch Videos Wii U

Video: You Can Beat Zelda: Breath of the Wild in Just 15 Minutes

The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild is only a little over a month away, and fans across the globe could not be more excited. YouTuber Jirard Khalil, who runs The One Video Gamer, recently spoke with Shigeru Miyamoto and Eiji Aonuma about Breath of the Wild and its game length. Although the game is massive and extremely difficult to 100% the game quickly, you could beat the game in approximately 15 minutes. According to Miyamoto and Aonuma, players can go straight to the final boss at the beginning of the game, although it would be nearly impossible to beat him. Aonuma suggests that fans upgrade Link first if they want to go straight to the final boss.

Additionally, Aonuma and Miyamoto discussed the developmental process and the hurdles that they went through. At one point, Miyamoto was worried the game would not be finished. During the making of the game, Aonuma would have the entire staff play a portion of
Breath of the Wild before working on the next phase of the game. Some of the physics in the game also gave the developers a headache. The wind would blow away in-game items and had to be adjusted accordingly.

Will you attempt to beat the final boss early when you first play
Breath of the Wild? Discuss in the comments below!

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How Zelda: Breath of the Wild is Nintendo’s Most Ambitious Game Ever

Eiji Aonuma, the producer of the Zelda series, has been extraordinarily busy this week with interviews and press conferences about the upcoming The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild. Several French news outlets, like Le Monde, Jeuxvideo.com, and Gamekult have published interviews with Aonuma, in which he talked about all sorts of topics surrounding the game’s art style, its massive overworld, its inspirations, and more.

Above all else, one thing is clear about this new game:
Zelda: Breath of the Wild will be the most ambitious title in Nintendo’s history.

Nintendo Everything has compiled extensive translations of these interviews, giving us a huge amount of news about Breath of the Wild. Here are some of the highlights from these stories:

The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild is Absolutely Enormous

According to Aonuma, the team that created
The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild consisted of about 300 Nintendo employees, who worked on the game full-time for about four years (ever since late 2012). We already knew that Breath of the Wild had the biggest development team in Nintendo’s history, but we didn’t expect it to be this large. For comparison’s sake, Super Mario 3D World, the Mario game with the biggest development team so far, was only worked on by about 90 Nintendo employees, which means that the team behind Breath of the Wild was more than three times as large as the one that created that game. 

300 employees wasn’t enough for Aonuma, however, as the man involved dozens of other developers, some of whom weren’t even employed by Nintendo, to help playtest the game. Nintendo staffers who were working on other projects were often brought in to give the team some feedback, and some other companies sent their employees to help out as well, although none were specified by Aonuma. Nintendo even went through the trouble of creating new tools to track players’ progress while playing the game, which gave them a better idea of the choices that different playtesters were making while trying
Breath of the Wild.

Monolith Soft, the studio that created the Xenoblade Chronicles series, was one of the companies that helped out the most with development. Developers from Monolith helped create many outdoor environments and gave Aonuma’s staff some pointers on topography and world-building. They also helped with some of Breath of the Wild‘s graphics and designed several art assets.

According to Aonuma,
Breath of the Wild didn’t even take that long to make from a technical standpoint; all of these developers were working on the game’s massive open world and the sheer number of ideas that were thrown into it.

Breath of the Wild is so big because Aonuma wanted to give players freedom similar to what was possible in the original Legend of Zelda for the Nintendo Entertainment System. Nintendo wanted to create something on a scale that it never had before, and they constantly made an effort to make every part of the world complex and interesting. For the first time in decades, it’s possible to get completely lost in a Zelda game, by simply wandering around and visiting places out of curiosity.

The Gameplay Was Inspired by Skyrim, Grand Theft Auto, The Witcher 3, and More

Aonuma had already revealed that
Breath of the Wild was inspired, in part, by the giant open world in The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim. However, in his interview with Jeuxvideo, Aonuma admitted that several other titles, like The Witcher 3 and the Grand Theft Auto series, have been great sources of inspiration as well when it came to exploration and freedom of choice.

Apart from these titles,
The Legend of Zelda: The Wind Waker was the greatest inspiration for Breath of the Wild‘s open world. When he was working on The Wind Waker in the early 2000s, Aonuma wanted to create a world that was filled to the brim with content, but he was limited by the hardware available at the time. Although he was happy with the final product of The Wind Waker, he had always wanted to go back and do more with the concept of the islands in the Great Sea, and this new game was a way to revisit that idea.

The Art Style Was Inspired by The Wind Waker, But It’s Perfect for this New Game

The cartoon-ish art style in
Breath of the Wild was inspired by The Wind Waker, which had a colorful, cel-shaded look. When Aonuma decided to use this style for Breath of the Wild, he was ignoring fans’ initial reaction to the visuals of The Wind Waker. The style was chosen simply because it fit the open environments of the game well, in part because it made things easier to see from far away, and because it provided some wonderful scenery of the natural environments.

Some of the artists who worked on
Breath of the Wild were also inspired by Japanese animation, including Studio Ghibli films like My Neighbor Totoro and Princess Mononoke. Several of the designers on the team had been brought up watching anime, and they wanted to implement some elements from it in the final game.

Porting the Game to Nintendo Switch was Much Easier than Bringing Twilight Princess to the Wii

The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess was originally meant to be a GameCube-exclusive, but it ended up becoming a launch title for the Wii; similarly, Breath of the Wild was originally meant to launch on the Wii U, but Nintendo eventually decided to release it on both Wii U and Nintendo Switch. According to Aonuma, back when he was working on Twilight Princess, he wasn’t given enough time to work on both versions of the game, and he was a much less experienced developer back then, so porting the game to the second console was extremely difficult for him and his team. This time, however, Nintendo breezed through the process, as they had ample time to port the game and ensure that both versions were of equal quality. Several aspects of the game had to be modified—for example, the team had to diminish the use of the GamePad in the Wii U version of the game, as they did not want to create such a rift between the two versions—but the process was generally quick and painless.

Aonuma Describes the “Essence” of Breath of the Wild

Finally, one of the main things that Aonuma stressed in several of these interviews is that
The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild was supposed to be about exploring and living in harmony with nature. Much of the game is spent exploring outdoor environments, and nature plays a much bigger role in the game than it ever has before, making the world much more immersive than it ever has been. The “essence” of the game is truly one of peace, freedom, and personal growth.

Recently, when talking with
Nintendo France, Aonuma was asked to comment on the main themes of the game, and he said this:

“The Zelda series has always told the evolution of Link in his world. At the start of the game, he’s not very strong, but little by little, he will gain power. The reason why the games takes place in very natural environments is that it seemed to suit those kinds of stories, and this time, nature has taken a bigger role. It’s an execution choice, as you are free of your movements and you will travel a lot. We had to make a gigantic world with great plains, to give players a feel of total immersion, and that’s why we worked a lot on the animation, ambient sounds, and nature sounds, to get a better feel of the different environments.”
— Eiji Aonuma


What do you guys think? Are you surprised by any of the facts surrounding the development of this game, such as the huge collaborative effort that it required? Do you see aspects of
Skyrim, The Witcher 3, and Grand Theft Auto in Breath of the Wild? Was this cartoon-ish art style the right decision, or should Nintendo have used a more realistic style for this title? Let us know in the comments below!

Source: Le Monde, Jeuxvideo.com, Gamekult, Nintendo France (via Nintendo Everything 1, 2, 3)

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News Nintendo Nintendo Switch Wii U

Skyrim Directly Inspired One of the Biggest New Features in Zelda: Breath of the Wild

Earlier this month, it was officially announced that Skyrim will be coming to the Nintendo Switch. It seems that Eiji Aonuma is a huge fan of the game, and it inspired some of The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild‘s exploration elements. Aonuma explained that every time you enter a new city in Skyrim, it is surprising because they are all different. He wanted to replicate this discovery in Breath of the Wild by allowing players to have the ability to climb everywhere and use the paraglider.

Here’s the quote from Eiji Aonuma. Please note it has been translated through Google Translate and may not be completely accurate:

“What really got me more in Skyrim is when you walk and you enter a new city, there is a real shock. ‘Ah, there’s a city here! And, oh, she’s so different from the others!’ This is the first time I’ve felt this in a video game, so I wanted to duplicate it in Zelda , albeit in a slightly different way.

“That’s why you can climb a little everywhere, and once up there, you can say, ‘Well, maybe there’s something over there… What if I went up that river?’ Then you take your flying wing, and you will explore the world after spotting it. This pleasure of discovery, I wanted to take it back from Skyrim , for I had never felt it elsewhere.” — Eiji Aonuma

What do you think about Aonuma’s thoughts? Let us know in the comments!

Source: Lemonde

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News Nintendo Nintendo Switch Wii U

Zelda: Breath of the Wild Has a Megaton of Voice Acting, But Only in One Language

When The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild‘s trailer was initially revealed, many fans were shocked to hear voice acting in a Zelda game, and many wondered what the extent of the voice acting would be. In a recent interview with Gamekult, series producer Eiji Aonuma explained that every cutscene in Breath of the Wild will feature full voice acting. Despite the huge amount of voice acting, though, players will only be able to listen to Breath of the Wild in their native language. Unlike other games that feature a dual audio option (English and Japanese), the latest Zelda game will not have that feature implemented.

If you wanted to have your audio in Japanese, you would have to change the Nintendo Switch’s system settings to Japanese, which would also alter the in-game text. While the lack of dual audio may be a bummer, I’m still excited to hear the voice acting in
Breath of the Wild. Share your own thoughts on the matter in the comments below!

Source: Gamekult (via Nintendo Everything (1, 2))

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Don’t Worry, Link’s Beloved Steed Epona Returns in Zelda: Breath of the Wild

Eiji Aonuma has been hinting at a lot of additions to The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild lately, such as the game having multiple endings. Now he has revealed that even though Link can tame wild horses in the game, the iconic Epona will be making an appearance as well. Aonuma wouldn’t go into specifics: “she’s in Breath of the Wild, but I do not want to reveal details about how to find her, or what that means.” While this is cryptic information, he’s probably just trying to protect fans from possible spoilers for the game.

What do you guys think of this? Do you think Epona will have the best stats out of all the horses in the game? Let us know your thoughts in the comments below!

Source: IGN Portugal (via GameSpot)

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Zelda: Breath of the Wild Has Multiple Endings

Nintendo is trying their best to break the modern conventions of The Legend of Zelda series with their newest installment, Breath of the Wild. We’ve seen a ton of new things in this game so far that we haven’t seen previously in the series, but producer Eiji Aonuma teased one tidbit that may surprise some: the possibility of multiple endings. Aonuma said, “There is an alternate ending if you meet certain criteria. If you do a few things, you may see a different ending.” While it’s unclear how the possible endings will be unlocked for now, it is an interesting addition to a Zelda title. We’ll have to wait until the game releases to find out just what this alternate ending could be, so all we can do for now is speculate.

What do you guys think of this? What sort of criteria do you think is required for a second ending? Do you think there will be more than just two? Let us know your thoughts in the comments below!

Source: IGN

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