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News Nintendo Nintendo Switch

Game Freak Hopes to Surprise Players in 2019

In 2018, Game Freak took the Pokémon franchise in a new direction with the launch of Pokémon: Let’s Go, Pikachu and Pokémon: Let’s Go, Eevee on Nintendo Switch. These hybrid games combine the traditional Pokémon formula with elements of Pokémon GO for a new kind of experience. Game Freak intends to follow these titles up with a more “core RPG” style Pokémon game this year, but that doesn’t necessarily mean it will be the same old experience we’re used to.

Speaking with popular Japanese publication Famitsu, Pokémon producers Junichia Masuda and Shigeru Ohmori shared a special New Year messages with fans. The two reflected on the success of Let’s Go in 2018 and also hinted at what’s to come this year.

“Happy New Year! Thanks to all of you, we were able to release the Pokémon: Let’s Go games back on November 16th. Everybody from all over the world experienced the games in a variety of ways: with the PokeBall Plus, by connecting their game with Pokémon GO, and even playing with two players! I’d like to extend my thanks for all your kind words. Everyone here at Game Freak is working hard on the next Pokémon title as well as other original titles – we hope you enjoy them! Thanks again, and see you in 2019!” —
Junichi Masuda

“Happy New Year! In 2018, Game Freak was able to announce both PokémonQuest and the Pokémon: Let’s Go games. Pokémon Quest was a game that presented the challenge of having to develop both the Switch and smartphone versions at the same time. And on looking back on the basis for Let’s Go’s development, we wanted to make a game that everybody could play – a Pokémon game for everybody! The staff as a whole had to repeatedly tackle a variety of challenges to make it happen. In 2019, Game Freak will continue to face the challenges we didn’t lose to last year; I want to keep surprising everybody in the year to come!” —
Shigeru Ohmori

According to Masuda, the team apparently has multiple games in the works. Ohmori then chimed in to state that Game Freak is hoping to surprise players in 2019, presumably with the new Pokémon titles. While the upcoming games will be a shift back to some of the more traditional elements of the series, The Pokémon Company CEO Tsunekazu Ishihara has previously indicated that the new games will also bring some changes. Back in June, he stated that the upcoming games will “give a good understanding of what an evolved Pokémon game looks like after it has continued to succeed the traditions of Game Freak.”

Source: Famitsu (via Nintendo Everything)

News Nintendo Videos

Watch Masuda Draw Pokémon From Memory in 30 Seconds


Junichi Masuda has been involved with the
Pokémon franchise since the very beginning, so if anyone should be familiar with its various creatures, it’s him. With all of that experience behind him, just how well can he recall and recreate details about their designs? In a new video from Game Freak Masuda competes with Kensaku Nabana, a field designer and modeler on Pokémon: Let’s Go, to draw Pokémon from memory in just 30 seconds.

Click above to watch the fun!

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News Nintendo Nintendo Switch

Masuda May Step Down as Pokémon’s Director After Let’s Go

Junichi Masuda has been a key member of the Pokémon development team since the very beginning. In the early days, he served as a composer, programmer, and advisor before eventually becoming an Assistant Director on Gold and Silver. Ever since then, Masuda has jumped back and forth between wearing the Director and Producer hats, and he’s currently serving as Director on Pokémon: Let’s Go, Pikachu and Pokémon: Let’s Go, Eevee.

While Masuda sees Let’s Go as an important evolution that could pave the way for another 20 years of Pokémon, he may not be the one to provide hands-on direction going forward. Masuda recently sat down for an interview on the official website for The Pokémon Company and answered questions regarding the development of Let’s Go. Near the end of the interview, he indicated that the upcoming Switch games would likely be his last as Director.

Question: It’s been five years since you last served as director—on Pokémon X and Pokémon Y. Why were these the right games for you to return to that role?

Masuda: I was the one who worked on the base game concept document for Pokémon GO, and even in that original concept, I had the idea of introducing new Pokémon through the mobile game. I wanted to realize that goal by creating games that could connect with Pokémon GO and feel somewhat similar to it without feeling like we were copying it. Given my involvement in Pokémon GO’s development, I felt that I was probably the best person to direct these games.

It was also interesting to work with Nintendo Switch. There’s a lot of technology packed into the hardware that we were all trying to discover at GAME FREAK. For example, developing the Poké Ball Plus and working with Bluetooth to facilitate the connection with Pokémon GO were both very interesting things that I had a chance to work on as the director this time.

But at the same time, it’s important to have the younger generation at GAME FREAK take over the development of Pokémon as a series. I do believe this will probably be, in terms of the main Pokémon RPGs, the last time that I work as the director.

While Masuda may be stepping away from the Director role, he’ll almost certainly continue to be involved with the franchise. As the interviewer pointed out, Masuda did not serve as Director on Omega Ruby, Alpha Sapphire, or any of the Sun and Moon games. Instead, he chose to take more of a supervisory role as Producer.

The third generation remakes and Sun and Moon were directed by Shigeru Ohmori, while Ultra Sun and Ultra Moon were directed by Kazumasa Iwao. Perhaps one or both of these talents could step up to become the primary Director for the series going forward. In any case, it’s hard to see Masuda abandoning the franchise altogether after 20 years of service.

Source: The Pokémon Company

News Nintendo Nintendo Switch

Here’s Why Pokémon Rivals Aren’t Jerks Anymore

Oh, Gary Oak. How we love to hate you. Gary, and his in-game counterpart, “Blue,” were total jerks. Armed with a bad attitude and the catchphrase “smell you later,” the first generation rival was someone you truly wanted to beat time and time again. Gary’s antics in the anime cemented him as a Pokémon and meme legend, and Blue followed suit.

These days, rivals in Pokémon games are far tamer. Characters like Hau in Pokémon Sun and Moon are more friend than foe. Pokémon: Let’s Go Pikachu and Pokémon: Let’s Go Eevee will follow this trend, despite the fact that the games are returning to Kanto, where the hated rival first appeared. Why the change, Game Freak? Producer Junichi Masuda had the explanation in a recent interview.

“I think the biggest reason that rivals were more of a jerk in the early days is that we were just limited in what we could express with the pixel graphics. There’s not much that you can do with that kind of little sprite on the screen, so we worked harder to characterize them through dialogue and give them certain personalities.”

“Also, because it’s just dialogue and there’s not a whole lot going on on the screen, it doesn’t give as harsh of an impression even if they’re jerks, I think. Now we have HD graphics and the visuals are much more impressive. If you also made him a jerk, the impression would be a lot stronger on players. Another thing, just my own personal take, is that it feels that people with those kinds of personalities these days are just not as accepted by players as they were back then.”
— Junichi Masuda

Masuda believes that modern graphics and modern audiences could lead to a jerk-rival being rejected by players. Personally, I think it just makes it that much rewarding when you stomp them in battle! There’s no replacing Gary Oak, but it would be nice to have a rival that’s at least a little more competitive.

Source: GameSpot

News Nintendo Nintendo Switch Videos

Masuda Talks Pokémon: Let’s Go on Nintendo Minute

Pokémon producer Junichi Masuda and artist Kensaku Nabana have been making the rounds in recent weeks, diving into Pokémon: Let’s Go, Pikachu and Pokémon: Let’s Go, Eevee details in near-constant interviews. For their latest stop, the two developers joined Nintendo Minute’s Krysta Yang and Kit Ellis to play Pokémon: Let’s Go while sharing their thoughts on the games’ visuals, the Poké Ball Plus accessory, Meltan, and more.

Check it out above!

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News Nintendo Nintendo Switch

Pokémon: Let’s Go Could be the “Starting Point” for Pokémon’s Next 20 Years

It’s been just over 20 years since Game Freak first delighted the world with a strange and exciting new series called Pokémon. All this time later, it’s still one of the biggest franchises ever, and it’s arguably more popular than ever thanks to the success of Niantic’s mobile hit Pokémon GO. Now Game Freak is hoping to bridge the gap between audiences new and old, and if they’re successful, it could lead to another 20 years of Pokémon.

Pokémon producer Junichi Masuda continued his packed interview tour with a recent discussion with The Verge. Masuda briefly touched on the success of Pokémon GO and the importance of it being timed alongside the 20th anniversary of the series. Moving on to the future of the historic franchise, Masuda indicated that Let’s Go could be the key to everything.

“The biggest thing I feel with
Let’s Go is really hoping that it’s going to serve as sort of a base or starting point for the next 20 years of Pokémon, I really think it’s important that Pokémon continues to be a positive force in the world — makes people happier, enriches their lives through a variety of ways. But I don’t think it needs to be a consistent, unchanging experience necessarily. I think there’s still a lot of room to explore variety, not only through the main series of games but also through the more spin-off titles.” — Junichi Masuda

Masuda isn’t necessarily saying that Let’s Go will become the new norm, but rather that it opens the franchise up to new possibilities. If there’s one thing Pokémon has definitely taught us, it’s that sometimes you need to evolve. That said, Masuda has also previously indicated that the Pokémon: Let’s Go brand could become its own series. In that scenario, the more traditional “core” games would likely continue alongside it, giving fans lots of options.

Source: The Verge

News Nintendo Nintendo Switch

Pokémon: Let’s Go Almost Had “Photorealistic” Graphics

The Kanto region, first explored in the original
Pokémon games on Game Boy, will soon be reborn in HD thanks to Pokémon: Let’s Go, Pikachu and Pokémon: Let’s Go, Eevee. For many players, Let’s Go will be their first-ever Kanto experience, while others will be returning to the region they fell in love with as children. Getting the look and feel of the region just right was a crucial point of development, and the visuals almost went in a completely different direction.

Pokémon producer Junichi Masuda and artist Kensaku Nabana have been on an interview tour answering all kinds of questions about the Let’s Go games over the past week, and the duo tackled the topic of graphics in a recent IGN discussion. According to Nabana, the team originally considered making use of Switch’s superior hardware (over 3DS) to push for a more photorealistic look.

“Really happy to hear you comment saying it’s a soothing experience. That’s exactly what we were trying to hear. Usually, when you would have much more power with the Switch and taking it into HD, I think the natural tendency is to go for a more photorealistic approach. In the earliest days of development, we actually explored that direction quite a bit. But we got the direction from Masuda, just like he just mentioned a moment ago, to go for this more kind and soothing and inviting experience with the visuals. After some experimentation, we just realized the more realistic, more photorealistic direction just wasn’t really working for what we were trying to do.”
— Kensaku Nabana

Game Freak eventually opted against realistic graphics due to the tone of the game. Masuda and his team envision the Let’s Go experience as relaxing and fun, and the more stylized visuals featured in the final build of the game better fit that theme. Are you happy with the end result?

Source: IGN

News Nintendo Nintendo Switch

Masuda Shares Details on Pokémon: Let’s Go’s Master Trainers

Pokémon trainers around the world are getting ready to return to Kanto (or visit it for the first time) in Pokémon: Let’s Go, Pikachu and Pokémon: Let’s Go, Eevee. Because they’re targeted at a wider audience, the Let’s Go games will be an easier and more casual experience (with a more “core” game coming in 2019), but there will be more challenging content for veteran fans after the main quest is completed.

In a recent interview, producer Junichi Masuda briefly commented on endgame content, including “Master Trainers.” Masuda was later joined by artist Kensaku Nabana for an interview with Eurogamer, and the two elaborated further on these post-credit challengers.

Eurogamer: What would you say to those players who are crying out for a bit more of a challenge, maybe adult players who’ve been playing for these 20 years or who got into it a bit later? Should they wait for next year’s RPG instead?

Junichi Masuda: So you know to those kinds of fans we’d mention the ‘catch combo’ mechanic, whereby you catch the same Pokémon multiple times in a row and get various rewards and benefits for that.

Kensaku Nabana: And also the postgame content as well, in particular the master trainers – so these are trainers who are kind of the ultimate trainers of a specific Pokémon, so you will challenge them. So you will challenge them, and then get their title for that Pokémon, so you become the master of that Pokémon if you manage to beat them in battle.

Junichi Masude: So for me, my favourite Pokémon is Psyduck, so I’d be training my Psyduck amazingly and then would challenge the Psyduck Master, and then gain the Psyduck Master title, and that’s something you can put a lot of effort and a lot of time into, if I really wanted to create a challenge for myself – and these Master Trainers exist for all of the 151 Pokémon in the game, so you know, if you want to collect all of the titles then that’s something you can really challenge yourself with.

It sounds like these Master Trainers will focus on a specific Pokémon, and you’ll have to best them using the same Pokémon. It’s an interesting way to get players to focus on monsters they might otherwise skip out on, but hopefully it’s not the only type of extra challenge awaiting the League Champion. It’d be nice to see more variety in the post-credits challenges.

Source: Eurogamer

News Nintendo Nintendo Switch Retro

Lavender Town is “Even Creepier” in Pokémon: Let’s Go

When Pokémon made its debut over 20 years ago, one of the most unsettling areas in the game was Lavender Town. Eerie music, a graveyard, ghost Pokémon, and possessed trainers all combined to make it a memorably creepy location. Now that Kanto is getting an HD remake in the Pokémon: Let’s Go games on Switch, Game Freak had to redesign the town for a new audience. And it sounds like we’re in for a treat.

In a recent interview with GameSpot, Pokémon producer Junichi Masuda and artist Kensaku Nabana fielded a variety of questions about changes in the upcoming remakes of Yellow. When the interviewer brought up the topic of Lavender Town and its impact in the original, Nabana revealed that some extra effort was put into capturing that atmosphere once again.

GameSpot: It definitely leaves a strong impression, seeing how different some very famous scenes from the old game are in Let’s Go, such as the first time you come to the S.S. Anne and see how much more majestic it looks. For some areas like Lavender Town, which was very creepy in the original games, how did you go about expressing that in Let’s Go Pikachu and Eevee?

Nabana: Lavender Town is definitely one that I don’t want to talk too much about and have you discover for yourself, but I definitely have the same impression as you. It’s kind of this creepy, unsettling place. So, I initially approached it with that in mind and designed it to make it look like it would give that impression. But that wasn’t enough for Mr. Masuda. He was like, “You’ve got to make it feel even creepier.” He gave me a lot of specific directions to do that. So, I think it will be fun to see what it looks like.

Nabana and Masuda stopped short of giving any specific details, but it sounds like Lavender Town is still focused on creeping players out, and that’s exactly how it should be. Hopefully, it lives up to its spooky billing.

Source: GameSpot

News Nintendo Nintendo Switch Trailers Videos

Pokémon: Let’s Go Gets a New Trailer and Endgame Details

We’re just weeks away now from the next evolution of the Pokémon franchise. Game Freak will launch Pokémon: Let’s Go, Pikachu and Pokémon: Let’s Go, Eevee on Nintendo Switch next month, giving players a blend of the traditional Pokémon formula and more modern GO-style gameplay. In the meantime, we got two more updates on the upcoming switch adventures today.

First up is a new “Adventure Awaits” trailer that gives us another extensive look at the Kanto region in HD. There isn’t much new in terms of gameplay reveals here, but there’s plenty of footage of trainers and their favorite Pokémon running, riding, surfing, and flying through the region that started it all. There are also plenty of looks at battling, catching Pokémon, encountering Legendary monsters, and even an appearance by Mewtwo.

Additionally, Pokémon producer Junichi Masuda gave fans a little teaser in a statement published by Polygon today. Masuda addressed the game’s additional content that will only be accessible after beating the Elite Four, and it sounds like there are some challenges in store.

“A good portion of the more difficult stuff is in the post-game. There’s ways to strengthen your Pokémon, and the reason you wanna do that is, you take on these master trainers, these really powerful trainers that you encounter after the main story.”
— Junichi Masuda

It sounds like famous trainers from other generations could be making a re-appearance, which is something fans of the core series have grown accustomed to seeing. Hopefully, there’s plenty of interesting content to keep players hooked long after the credits have rolled.

Source: Polygon

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News Nintendo Nintendo Switch

Pokémon Producer Junichi Masuda is Answering Questions From Fans

We’re less than two months away now from the launch of Pokémon: Let’s Go, Pikachu! and Pokémon: Let’s Go, Eevee! on Nintendo Switch, and The Pokémon Company is keeping things exciting with regular updates and new trailers. If that’s not enough for you, how about a chance for a little Q&A with Pokémon producer Junichi Masuda himself? Now’s your chance!

Masuda, along with artist Kensaku Nabana, will soon be sitting down with Nintendo Australia and New Zealand for a chat about the upcoming Switch games, and the interview will include questions from fans. If you’d like to have your voice heard, you can submit a question
on this Twitter post for a chance to have it featured.

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News Nintendo Nintendo Switch

Junichi Masuda is Revealing More Pokémon News This Week

It’s a great time to be a Pokémon fan! Pokémon GO is topping the charts, Pokémon: Let’s Go, Pikachu! and Let’s Go, Eevee! are just over two months away from launch, and a “core series RPG” is in the works for 2019. There’s plenty to be excited about already, and soon there will be more, as Pokémon producer Junichi Masuda is getting ready to drop another batch of news this week.

Masuda has announced that he’ll be appearing on the Japanese TV program Pokénchi (Gathering at the Pokémon House) to share the latest Pokémon news later this week. The program airs on Sunday, September 9th at 8:00 AM in Japan. For the US, that’s 4:00 PM Pacific / 7:00 PM Eastern on Saturday, September 8th. It will air around midnight in the UK, and 1:00 AM on Sunday in Europe.

It’s not clear at this time exactly what Masuda will be sharing, but more details on the Let’s Go games are a virtual certainty. We also may get the news before the TV broadcast, as The Pokémon Company will often put out a press release and trailer shortly before these TV appearances. Either way, we’ll be covering all the exciting news as it happens, so tune in to Gamnesia for all your Pokémon needs!

Source: Serebii

News Nintendo Nintendo Switch

Masuda Shares Details About the 2019 Pokémon Games

Millions of fans are eagerly awaiting Pokémon: Let’s Go, Pikachu! and Pokémon: Let’s Go, Eevee! this November, but others are looking even further ahead. Series producer Junichi Masuda has already confirmed that a “core RPG” is in the works for 2019. Virtually no details were given at the time of the initial tease, but Masuda has since dropped a few comments on the game to Famitsu.

We don’t yet have the full transcript of the Famitsu conversation, but a few interesting Masuda lines have been translated. According to Masuda, Game Freak is “working with the idea that everyone will be playing on their own Switch” when the 2019 game launches, so they’re designing it to have “the same kind of feeling as the previous games on handheld systems.”

Many fans have been wondering how transferring Pokémon will work in the Let’s Go games. Will you be able to transfer your Go and Let’s Go monsters to other existing games or to the 2019 games? We don’t have all the answers yet, but Masuda indicated that he wants players to be able to do so.

“There have been times where you couldn’t bring Pokemon over from previous titles – I imagine that created some bad memories. I want to try and change that, if I can.”
— Junichi Masuda

That’s all the new info we have so far, but we’ll keep you posted if and when more relevant quotes are translated. We’re still about a year and a half away from the “core” games, so details will be scarce for now. Once 2019 rolls around we’ll likely see more regular updates.

Source: Ryokutya2089 (via Nintendo Everything)

News Nintendo

Don’t Expect an Open World Pokémon Game Anytime Soon

Following the reveal of
Pokémon: Let’s Go, Pikachu! and Let’s Go, Eevee! for Nintendo Switch, series producer/director Junichi Masuda sat down with Eurogamer to talk about the future of the franchise. After revealing that Let’s Go could evolve into its own series alongside the main games, Masuda tackled the topic of a future Pokémon game potentially having an open world.

As Eurogamer pointed out, Nintendo has opted to introduce open worlds, or just larger open areas in general, to some of its flagship titles on Switch.
The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild had a massive map that gave the player more freedom to roam than any previous game, and Super Mario Odyssey also gave players sizable areas to explore and took a step back from forced linear gameplay. Will Pokémon ever do the same? Based on Masuda’s answer, this is possible, but not particularly likely.

You said earlier there were a few things that never changed in Pokémon Go but have changed in Let’s Go – with Nintendo choosing to make others like Mario and Zelda more of an open world, for the next Pokémon did you want to experiment with more of an open world, with exploration and roaming?

Masuda: So with the Pokémon games I’m sure you all know we’re always trying to make them fun appealing for players of all ages, not just to older players and not just to kids. So, I can’t really commit either way but, if we find a way – I think it’s possible – if we were to find a way to preserve the fun and kind of broad appeal of Pokémon, and also have that kind of more open gameplay, then that is one possibility. It’s hard to say right now.

So that’s definitely, those type of questions, I always – I wouldn’t say worried – but in some way I’m always concerned that we go and take it too far, so it’s no longer approachable? I used to be a fan of top-down shooting games, like R-Type [points to a nearby arcade machine], and as time went on that shooting genre just kept pursuing that sort of more difficult, more complicated direction and it just got to the point where people couldn’t enjoy them as much and they just weren’t as approachable as they used to be. So I just want to make sure that, at Pokémon, we don’t make that same kind of – I don’t want to say mistake but, go down that same direction.

As is often the case, Masuda is trying to walk the fine line between innovating and keeping the game accessible.
Pokémon is generally geared towards a younger audience, and many could find an open world overwhelming. That said, Masuda does indicate that it’s possible in the future, but it doesn’t sound like there are any plans in motion for that sort of experience.

Source: Eurogamer

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News Nintendo Nintendo Switch

Pokémon: Let’s Go Could Become Its Own Series

Last week The Pokémon Company officially revealed
Pokémon: Let’s Go, Pikachu! and Let’s Go, Eevee! for Nintendo Switch. The two Switch games, which combine classic Pokémon gameplay with elements from Pokémon GO, will release this November. If they’re not your style, Nintendo will follow them up with a “core series RPG” next year.

So what about the future? Which one of these styles will be the future of the franchise? If the games are well received, the answer could be both. Series producer (and often director) Junichi Masuda sees
Let’s Go as a way to reach GO fans and show them more of the Pokémon world, but he doesn’t want to abandon the more “core” fans who have been around for years.

How do you think the core RPG players will react to the Let’s Go games? I know Pokémon Go was immensely popular but it had quite a mixed reaction amongst more ‘hardcore’ players – how do you appease those players and is it more a case that they should wait to 2019 for the game they’re after?

Masuda: So the first thing I can say is that… I’ve been the director on the main series Pokémon RPGs – most of them, up until now – and there are a lot of kind of core tenets or rules of the series that I’ve never broke up until now, for example the whole idea of the flow of going into a battle against wild Pokémon, reducing their health and then catching them. That was one of the things that we just never wanted to change but, with these games specifically, I wanted to create a new experience for kids and with this time I decided to shift that towards more of a kind of casual, lighter experience. So that’s one of the things I wanted to do…

… So for me, having worked on the Pokémon main series games, and Pokémon Go, both the players who have enjoyed our RPGs until now, all the fans are extremely important to me – but also the people who played Pokémon Go, and that was their first Pokémon game, they’re also extremely important to me, and what I really want to do with these games is prevent both of these types of players from going in different directions, and I’m hoping that these games will kind of bring them together.

Related to that, looking forward, do you envisage there being two series of Pokémon games, say a Let’s Go series and a main series like Sun and Moon – are there going to be two or are they going to come together again?

Masuda: So I’d say there’s a possibility of that, should the games sell really well and obviously a lot of people play them, but right now we’re really focusing on the development, and just getting a lot of people to play the games in the first place!

If Let’s Go has a successful start and earns its spot as a spin-off series (like Mystery Dungeon), Game Freak will have effectively created a casucal-to-core Pokémon pipeline for the future. GO attracts players by the tens of millions with its zero-cost starting point and simple mechanics. Let’s Go introduces these casual fans to more of the Pokémon world, including in-game regions and traditional battles. Then finally, the core games are there for the most dedicated of fans who want the deepest gameplay. It’s a genius idea that will keep the franchise strong for years to come.

Source: Eurogamer

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DS News Nintendo

Pokémon Black and White Got Sequels Instead of a Third Title Because of Their Central Theme

Back in 2012, just after the release of Pokémon Black and White, many fans were expecting Game Freak to announce a third version like they had done with past Pokémon games. However, the company averted expectations when a brand new set of games were announced: Pokémon Black 2 and White 2. Ever since then, Game Freak hasn’t been consistent with releasing a third version of their games with each new generation. Now, Junichi Masuda has explained why they originally turned away from this tradition.

“A lot of people were expecting Pokémon Gray at the time, but the concept of Black and White was kind of these opposing forces – a yin-yang kind of thing. If we went with Gray, it would have moved away from that concept so we decided to keep the titles there.” — Junichi Masuda

Since we haven’t seen a third version of a Pokémon game since Platinum, it’s safe to assume that Game Freak is no longer holding on to this pattern of release. And with the release of Ultra Sun and Ultra Moon later this year, it seems that the developers are more interested in making new stories in the same world rather than just expanding on elements of the old story.

What do you guys think? Did you enjoy Black 2 and White 2? Would you have preferred a third game like Pokémon Gray? Let us know what you think in the comments below!

Source: Game Informer (via Nintendo Everything)

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News Nintendo Nintendo Switch

Masuda Says Game Freak Will Wait Until Nintendo Switch is Out Before Deciding Pokemon’s Future on It

Despite rumors of a third version of Pokémon Sun and Moon coming to the Nintendo Switch, Game Freak says they’re unsure how the series will fit in with the system. In a recent interview with Meristation, Junichi Masuda, the current producer of the series, said that the Nintendo Switch “is the future,” but the company will wait to see how it is received by the public before deciding how it will affect the future of Pokémon.

Masuda added that no matter what type of games they make for Switch, Game Freak will always stick with Nintendo, since that’s where their fans are. The company is looking forward and will evolve with Nintendo hardware as it releases in the future.

What do you guys think? What sort of Pokémon games do you want to see on the Switch? Let us know in the comments below!

Source: Meristation

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News Nintendo Retro

Pokémon’s Producer Discusses the Challenges They Faced Translating Red and Blue into English

The most recent issue of Retro Gamer included an interview with Junichi Masuda and Ken Sugimori, the producer and main character designer behind Pokémon Red and Blue. The pair discussed many of the problems that Game Freak had with developing the first Pokémon games, from the lack of space available on the Game Boy cartridges to the difficulties of coordinating the games with the anime. One of the most interesting parts of the interview deal with the localization of Pokémon Red and Blue, and the difficulties that Game Freak had while translating the games to English.

Surprisingly, one of the biggest challenges that the development team faced while translating the game was storage. The English language, with its Latin alphabet, takes up much more space than Japanese script, so the English version of Red and Blue didn’t fit into the Game Boy cartridge. In Japanese, the description for every Pokédex entry fit into a single page; in English, this had to be expanded into two pages for most Pokémon. Because of this, the developers had to spend some time changing the names of several Pokémon and changing much of the text to make it fit, which delayed the English versions of the games considerably.

“With the capacity problems mentioned earlier, one thing that we found is that English takes up more space on the cart than Japanese. We had no room! Everything was so full on that cartridge and there was little space to implement English at the time we created it. So we had a lot of memory problems to solve – things like changing Pokémon names and even the name entry screen, which was all designed in Japanese. To change that to accommodate English was really difficult and something we hadn’t considered when first designing the game. We really had to spend a lot of time working on all of this.

“Another example is the Pokédex. In the original Japanese versions, you just had one screen and everything was displayed there whereas in the US and European versions, it had to be changed to have two screens with the names and details of the Pokémon. Doing all these great changes took a long time, so that was what contributed to the delay. We never expected things to be so popular abroad, either – we had no idea this would be such a phenomenon so that was really amazing. But yes, it took a long time to make all the changes needed to get the game into different markets.” — Junichi Masuda

What do you guys think? Would you have expected that English would pose such a challenge for translators?

Source: Retro Gamer (via Nintendo Everything)

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3DS News Nintendo

The Official Soundtrack for Pokémon Sun and Moon is Now Available on iTunes

After months of growing anticipation, Pokémon Sun and Moon finally launched for the Nintendo 3DS, complete with new Pokémon to collect, a new story to tell in the region of Alola, and a ton of brand new music. Those eager to listen to the sounds of Alola exclusively were pleased when The Pokémon Company confirmed that the games’ soundtrack will launch internationally on iTunes in November.

Wait no more, for the Pokémon Sun & Pokémon Moon Super Music Collection has dropped at last earlier today, costing a meager $9.99 for a compilation of 169 songs. Do you have any particular favorites from the games’ OST? Share your thoughts with us in the comments below!

Source: iTunes

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Pokémon’s Producer Explains Why So Many Sun & Moon Details Have Been Revealed Before Launch

Game Freak’s beloved Pokémon franchise is over twenty years old now, and in just a few days it will evolve once more with the launch of Pokémon Sun and Moon and the seventh generation. While it’s natural for a developer to hype up their game before launch, Sun and Moon have seen a particularly steady flow of news, with regularly-released new trailers, commercials, interviews, magazine articles, livestream events, and more. Why has there been so much? Speaking with gamesTM, Pokémon producer Junichi Masuda gave his answer to that question.

“We’ve got this change in the style and play of the game, but one thing we’re aware of is that previously, you’ve been able to keep excitement just by saying one or two things about the game and people remained excited. Nowadays, you can say some things and people can lose interest quite quickly – it becomes yesterday’s news and something else is exciting. We want to try and keep people interested with this slow, continual release of new information and hopefully people will still be looking forward to the game by the time it comes out.”
— Junichi Masuda

Have you been happy with how Nintendo and The Pokémon Company have handled the marketing campaign for Pokémon Sun and Moon, or do you think they’re spoiling too many potential surprises? Leave your thoughts in the comments below!

Pokémon Sun and Moon will launch worldwide on November 18th for Nintendo 3DS. If you’re already sure you want to explore the Pokémon-filled world of Alola, Amazon lets you preorder Pokémon Sun right here and Pokémon Moon right here. You can also preorder the games’ official strategy guide and its hardcover collector’s edition at the respective links.

Source: gamesTM (via Nintendo Everything)

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