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Tamaki Explains What Happened to the GameCube’s Cancelled Kirby Adventure

Last week’s episode of Gamnesia’s Nintendo podcast featured Liam Robertson, better known as Tamaki from Unseen64, as a special guest, and towards the end of the discussion we took questions from listeners like you. One of you asked what he knows about many Kirby games that have been cancelled over the years, and most specifically the cancelled GameCube game Nintendo showed off in 2005.

Check out the discussion video above for our full discussion of these games, or keep reading for a brief, brief summary.

Robertson explains that many of these
Kirby games ultimately fell through for one reason or another, but many of their core ideas have returned for future installments. The GameCube title, for example, featured a totem mechanic that surfaced in Kirby’s Return to Dream Land on the Wii. Other Kirby concepts were more vague, but a lot of their rough gameplay ideas have ultimately manifested themselves in Return to Dream Land or Kirby Triple Deluxe.

For more fascinating information from our time with Tamaki, you can check out the full episode, which you can find either on iTunes, or embedded directly below—this discussion begins around eighty minutes in. You could also
subscribe to our YouTube channel, where we’ll be posting more of these discussion snippets throughout the coming week. And do be sure to stay tuned here on the site for more.

If you like this video, you can
subscribe to Nintendo Week on iTunes, where we release new episodes every Wednesday. If you don’t like long-form podcasts, you can subscribe to us on YouTube, where our discussion segments are uploaded on Thursdays, and these select snippets from the rest of the podcast—which we call NWC—are uploaded throughout the week. If you like what you hear, we’d love it if you leave us a review on iTunes, or send us your feedback! We’d love to know what you think of the show, and how you think we can improve it.

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If you like this video, you can
subscribe to Nintendo Week on iTunes, where we release new episodes every Wednesday. If you don’t like long-form podcasts, you can subscribe to us on YouTube, where our discussion segments are uploaded on Thursdays, and these select snippets from the rest of the podcast—which we call NWC—are uploaded throughout the week. If you like what you hear, we’d love it if you leave us a review on iTunes, or send us your feedback! We’d love to know what you think of the show, and how you think we can improve it.

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The Infamous “Project HAMMER” Cost Nintendo Over Half the Game’s Developers and Millions of Dollars

A cancelled project can go by many codenames and tentative titles in its shortened lifespan — in today’s case, these would include Machinex, Wii Crush, or, more popularly, Project H.A.M.M.E.R.

The ill-fated beat-em-up developed by Nintendo of America’s Software Technology division broke into the gaming limelight for the first and only time way back at E3 2006, with development put on hold in 2007 before it was ultimately cancelled two years later. Little has been said or heard of Project H.A.M.M.E.R. after the game’s production collapsed, but one ugly reason has since come to light: hostile internal conflicts within the company. It was the egregiously polarizing viewpoints between Nintendo of Japan and Nintendo of America’s philosophies towards game development that hammered the final nail in the could’ve-been-game’s coffin.

It turns out that the true story is a whole lot more sinister than initially perceived, as Liam Robertson, popularly known as Tamaki of Unseen64, reports that the whole ordeal cost Nintendo over a million dollars, as well as over half of its dev team members at NST.

Be sure to check out the first part of his analysis for a complete backstory of the cancelled Wii title!

Tamaki has recently joined us on Nintendo Week to discuss the lack of traditional Metroid games and Shovel Knight‘s favorable standing with Nintendo of Japan’s execs, among other topics.

Source: Unseen64

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Tamaki Explains Why Nintendo is Making so Few Traditional Metroid Games Lately

The Metroid series has been dormant for five years now, and although the Metroid-branded Federation Force is coming out in a matter of time, fans are thirsty for another spacefaring adventure starring Samus Aran. There have been a number of Metroid projects kicked around over the last few years, including Metroid Dread and a few conceptual games for Nintendo 3DS, but every one of them has ended up falling apart.

We brought in Liam Robertson, also known as Tamaki of Unseen64, for
this week’s episode of Gamnesia’s Nintendo podcast and asked him what on Earth is going on at Nintendo that prevents Metroid from returning to its former glory. Check out the discussion video above for the full answer and discussion, or keep reading below for a brief, brief summary.

Robertson explains that NCL, Nintendo’s executive branch in Japan, is extremely averse to taking financial risks with their projects. He says that the notion that Nintendo’s scared to make new
Metroid games isn’t particular to the Metroid series, and applies to the way they invest in a lot of their franchises.

“It’s a combination of them being very risk-averse, not wanting to [screw] up Metroid again, and ‘when are their creative people going to be free?’ Let me just say, I think there is the potential that there’s a Metroid game in development—it’s whether we see it next year or the year after, I think. They’re always working on new Metroid stuff, and a lot of the time it just doesn’t materialize for one reason or another.” —
Liam Robertson

For more fascinating information from our time with Tamaki, you can check out the full episode, which you can find either on iTunes, or embedded directly below—this discussion begins at about the one-hour mark. You could also
subscribe to our YouTube channel, where we’ll be posting more of these discussion snippets throughout the coming week. And do be sure to stay tuned here on the site for more.

If you like this video, you can
subscribe to Nintendo Week on iTunes, where we release new episodes every Wednesday. If you don’t like long-form podcasts, you can subscribe to us on YouTube, where our discussion segments are uploaded on Thursdays, and these select snippets from the rest of the podcast—which we call NWC—are uploaded throughout the week. If you like what you hear, we’d love it if you leave us a review on iTunes, or send us your feedback! We’d love to know what you think of the show, and how you think we can improve it.

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Our Verdict

If you like this video, you can
subscribe to Nintendo Week on iTunes, where we release new episodes every Wednesday. If you don’t like long-form podcasts, you can subscribe to us on YouTube, where our discussion segments are uploaded on Thursdays, and these select snippets from the rest of the podcast—which we call NWC—are uploaded throughout the week. If you like what you hear, we’d love it if you leave us a review on iTunes, or send us your feedback! We’d love to know what you think of the show, and how you think we can improve it.

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Tamaki Says Nintendo’s Japanese Executives Really Like Shovel Knight, Even Though it’s Not Out Yet

Liam Robertson, a researcher known under the name “Tamaki” for uncovering information on cancelled games, joined our latest episode of the Nintendo Week Podcast to discuss some of the many discoveries he’s made in his time investigating Nintendo. One of the subjects that came up was the rumor he broke a few months ago that Shovel Knight is joining Super Smash Bros. as a DLC fighter, and while he couldn’t say whether he personally knows whether it’s true, he did explain part of the reason he believes it’s more likely than not.

Based on information that he’s heard from sources within Nintendo and other prominent companies in the industry, he speculates that Nintendo’s Japanese headquarters is really quite fond of Shovel Knight. As he explains:

I think one of the reasons I can hold onto the Shovel Knight rumor is because it is evident that NCL does like Shovel Knight quite a lot. They pursued Yacht Club Games and said to them, ‘we want you to be the first third-party to independently produce an Amiibo.’

Colin: Did NCL approach them and say that? That was not Yacht Club’s decision?

No, [Nintendo] came after them, I believe.

I later contacted Robertson for clarification, and he said he’s heard from a source within Nintendo that Nintendo did not directly propose the Amiibo, but rather they invited Yacht Club Games to propose ways to make
Shovel Knight‘s Wii U and 3DS versions stand out from Sony and Microsoft’s. One of many ideas Yacht Club proposed was a Shovel Knight Amiibo, and while Nintendo rejected a few of their early pitches for the product, they eventually settled on game features and a figurine that made everyone happy.

You can find his full thoughts from our discussion in the video above.

For more fascinating news from our time with Tamaki, you can check out the full episode, which you can find either on iTunes, or embedded directly below—this discussion begins around the 42-minute mark. You could also or
subscribe to our YouTube channel, where we’ll be posting more of these discussion snippets throughout the coming week. And do be sure to stay tuned here on the site for more.

If you like this video, you can
subscribe to Nintendo Week on iTunes, where we release new episodes every Wednesday. If you don’t like long-form podcasts, you can subscribe to us on YouTube, where our discussion segments are uploaded on Thursdays, and these select snippets from the rest of the podcast—which we call NWC—are uploaded throughout the week. If you like what you hear, we’d love it if you leave us a review on iTunes, or send us your feedback! We’d love to know what you think of the show, and how you think we can improve it.

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ChannelImages
Our Verdict

If you like this video, you can
subscribe to Nintendo Week on iTunes, where we release new episodes every Wednesday. If you don’t like long-form podcasts, you can subscribe to us on YouTube, where our discussion segments are uploaded on Thursdays, and these select snippets from the rest of the podcast—which we call NWC—are uploaded throughout the week. If you like what you hear, we’d love it if you leave us a review on iTunes, or send us your feedback! We’d love to know what you think of the show, and how you think we can improve it.

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Our Verdict

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