During an interview with Famitsu, Yu Suzuki explained why he decided to use Kickstarter for pushing
Shenmue III to the masses. He originally didn’t even know what Kickstarter was. A fan drew him to the website as a suggestion, and Suzuki researched it from there. It was not his immediate decision to utilize Kickstarter, though.

Below is a portion of Suzuki’s interview:

— And for the means to make it happen, you chose Kickstarter. Why?

Suzuki: About three years ago, one of the fans who has experience using Kickstarter suggested me using it for the Shenmue project. That is when I first learned about Kickstarter, and started researching it. If it comes to really making the game, I have to make sure it satisfies my fans. So I couldn’t go like “OK I’m doing this with Kickstarter!” I seeked other ways,— for instance finding a partner, but I couldn’t find one that meets my requirements. After careful consideration, we decided that Kickstarter is the best way to set off, and we were able to announce it finally in 2015.

—So you were just saying that you wanted to make the sequel, but really you have been working on it already for a long time.

Suzuki: Yes. Strong feedback after the Shenmue lecture at GDC 2014 also pushed me into coming this far. Sega agreeably licenced it to me and SCE also supported us by saying “We will support you if you are making Shenmue.” I knew that announcing the Kickstarter project at SCE’s conference is a very remarkable thing and am so happy that many people still support Shenmue this much.

Kickstarter seems as good an option as any when you’re wanting fans to be able to contribute. Do you think it was wise for Suzuki to utilize the website for
Shenmue III? Tell us in the comments!

Source: Famitsu (via Shenmue Dojo)

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Mariah Beem
I am very fond of video games, which is why I chose my major of Video Game Design with focus on Narrative. The idea of being able to make people feel the way I do about games through my own game is my main goal. I want to be able to give gamers a way to connect and be brought together by an experience that could be powered by elation, sadness, or even fear. It is emotions such as those that hook people into games and make them want more. By connecting a well-thought story with mechanics, character design, level design, and even audio, a game can be unstoppable - and ridiculously fun to play. I believe that narrative design is not a static thing. For narrative to be done well, it must be fluid and dynamic - something that is able to be changed by the player. Whether that be by choices, the knowledge the player gains from exploring, or simply who the player talks to, the story must bend and change and grow. This is why I want to be a narrative designer: there is definitely more to it than meets the eye, and I love a challenge.

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